Behind the Image: Snowed-in (E)

A passing winter storm has blanketed Zurich Airport in heavy snow, resulting in a temporary closure. Following the diligent work of the snow removal team, it is now time to resume flights. Before this Airbus A220 can take to the skies again, the residual snow on its wings and fuselage must be removed. It is patiently waiting for its turn at the de-icing pad, a bit like a beauty makeover.

Why is De-Icing necessary? Well, Flight Safety First!

Mrs. Holle was extremely diligent! Tirelessly, she shook out her snow pillows, and the thick snowflakes fell from the sky. They enveloped Switzerland in a fairytale winter dress, albeit not without causing a bit of chaos in public transport. Especially at Zurich Airport, the snow removal teams could hardly keep up, trying to clear the runways and taxiways. Thanks to their relentless efforts, normalcy gradually returned the next day. Under sunny skies and frosty temperatures, the airport offered spectators an impressive spectacle: the snow-covered planes, treated by de-icing vehicles, sparkled in the sunlight. Like this Airbus A220, patiently waiting to be freed from its thick snow cover before takeoff. Have you ever watched a plane being de-iced, and do you know why this process is necessary?

 

For several years, the aviation industry has adhered to the so-called "clean aircraft concept." This safety initiative ensures that before takeoff, frozen deposits are removed not only from the fuselage but especially from the critical flight surfaces. These include the upper side of the wings, as well as the rudder and elevators.

 

In order to see anything at all, the mechanic removes the snow from the cockpit windows.
In order to see anything at all, the mechanic removes the snow from the cockpit windows.

The necessity of de-icing becomes apparent when considering that ice, frost, or snow on the aircraft not only reduce lift but also simultaneously increases drag and the overall weight. Neglecting to de-ice the aircraft could, in extreme cases, lead to a critical flight condition.

Once all passengers are on board, and the doors and cargo doors are closed, de-icing can commence. Depending on local regulations, this may occur either directly at the gate or at a designated de-icing pad. Pilots use checklists to configure and then the procedure can begin. Typically, a vehicle approaches each side of the aircraft, and the ground crew promptly begins spraying the aircraft.

At Zurich Airport, there are two de-icing areas, known as "De-Icing Pads." These are located close to the runways, facilitating a prompt departure after de-icing and better containment of the de-icing fluid.
At Zurich Airport, there are two de-icing areas, known as "De-Icing Pads." These are located close to the runways, facilitating a prompt departure after de-icing and better containment of the de-icing fluid.

Behind the general term "De-Icing," there are, in fact, two subcategories. While they may appear similar at first glance, they differ with a small but significant distinction. Depending on weather conditions, we determine whether the aircraft needs only de-icing or requires an additional protective layer. This second step, known as "Anti-Icing," becomes necessary only in the presence of precipitation and prevents the reformation of ice on the critical flight surfaces. To facilitate identification, they are also distinguished by color: Regardless of the type of de-icing fluid, the de-icing step is always marked in orange, while the anti-icing step is colored green.

At the de-icing station, two vehicles are already waiting for us. We completed the "Before De-Icing" checklist and communicated with the ground crew via radio. Soon the de-icing will commence.
At the de-icing station, two vehicles are already waiting for us. We completed the "Before De-Icing" checklist and communicated with the ground crew via radio. Soon the de-icing will commence.

Back to our flight

After a short wait, we taxied to the assigned de-icing pad, completed the checklist, and coordinated the procedure with the ground crew via radio. The method chosen primarily depends on the weather conditions. In our case, since it's still snowing, both steps are required. In the first step, the thick layer of snow is removed, and then, in the second step, a protective layer is applied. In both steps, a mixture of water, glycol, and other additives is used. This mixture is non-toxic and biodegradable. The ground crew calculates the optimal ratio that provides the necessary protection while being cost-effective. Based on this ratio and the current weather conditions, we can calculate the "Hold Over Time" in the cockpit. This timeframe determines how long the protective layer will last, shielding the critical flight surfaces from the reformation of ice and snow. It can range from a few minutes in very cold temperatures or heavy precipitation to around an hour in milder conditions.

From the cockpit, we watch the ground crew treating our aircraft with utmost care ensuring that we can take off safely shortly. This duration, by the way, varies between 10 and 30 minutes, depending on the size of the aircraft, the de-icing method applied, and the current weather conditions. Typically, during the de-icing of an aircraft at Zurich Airport, at least five members of the ground crew are involved. On one side, the two operators of the de-icing vehicles who skillfully maneuver their equipment high above on the articulated arm to delicately spray the aircraft. They are supported by various positions, including the De-Icing Coordinator, overseeing the entire process, the Pad Coordinator (bottom right), communicating with the pilots via radio, and a De-Icing Pad Coordinator (bottom left), monitoring the actual de-icing process.

Photo Tip

Especially impressive shots are captured during twilight and at night when using a slightly longer exposure time, creating a distinctive visual effect.

“SWISS Three-Alpha-Zulu, from De-Icing”

Over the radio, we receive all the details about the just completed procedure. After a final checklist, we taxi to the runway, ready to take off into the morning sky above ZRH in a matter of moments.

 

Flightlapse

Enjoy this collection of timelapse sequences of the winter ops at ZRH.

De-iced and ready, we take off into the morning sky above the winter wonderland.
De-iced and ready, we take off into the morning sky above the winter wonderland.
Dreamy views over the main Alpine ridge during the early morning hours. Those who look closely might even recognize the Matterhorn.
Dreamy views over the main Alpine ridge during the early morning hours. Those who look closely might even recognize the Matterhorn.

About the Image

The February image in my current photo calendar "Snowed-in" features a freshly snow-covered Airbus A220 at Zurich Airport, taken the day after intense snowfall. This image explicitly illustrates how aviation is significantly influenced by weather conditions, and especially winter weather necessitates numerous special procedures to ensure safe flight operations.

 

Captured with a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF100-400 IS II USM @234mm at ISO 640, f/5.0, and 1/200 sec.


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.

0 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Snowed-in (D)

Frau Holle war äusserst fleissig! Unermüdlich schüttelte sie ihre Schneekissen aus und die dicke Schneeflocken fielen vom Himmel. Sie hüllten die Schweiz in ein märchenhaftes Winterkleid allerdings nicht ohne dabei im öffentlichen Verkehr für das ein oder andere Chaos zu sorgen. Insbesondere am Flughafen Zürich kamen die Schneeräumtruppen zwischenzeitlich kaum noch hinterher, die Pisten und Rollwege freizuräumen. Dank ihrer unermüdlichen Arbeit kehrte am Tag danach allmählich wieder Normalität ein. Bei Sonnenschein und frostigen Temperaturen bot sich den Zuschauern am Flughafen ein beeindruckendes Schauspiel: Die schneebedeckten Flugzeuge, die von den Enteisungsfahrzeugen bearbeitet wurden, glitzerten im Sonnenlicht. So auch dieser Airbus A220, der vor dem Abflug geduldig darauf wartet von seiner dicken Schneedecke befreit zu werden. Hast du schon einmal ein Flugzeug beim Enteisen beobachtet und weisst du, warum dieser Vorgang überhaupt notwendig ist?

Warum wird überhaupt enteist? Flight Safety First!

Seit einigen Jahren gilt in der Luftfahrt das sogenannte "clean aircraft concept". Dieses Sicherheitsbestreben stellt sicher, dass vor dem Abflug gefrorenen Ablagerungen vom Rumpf, inssondere aber von den kritischen Flugflächen entfernt werden. Hierzu zählen die Flügeloberseite, sowie das Seiten- und Höhenruder.

Vor jedem Abflug begutachtet einer der beiden Piloten das Flugzeug. Nebst generellen Beschädigungen inspiziert er/sie dabei besonders die Triebwerke und Reifen. Weiter wird geprüft, ob sich auf den kritsichen Flugflächen gefrorene Ablagungen befinden.
Vor jedem Abflug begutachtet einer der beiden Piloten das Flugzeug. Nebst generellen Beschädigungen inspiziert er/sie dabei besonders die Triebwerke und Reifen. Weiter wird geprüft, ob sich auf den kritsichen Flugflächen gefrorene Ablagungen befinden.
Um "überhaupt" etwas zu sehen entfernt der Mechaniker den Schnee von den Cockpitscheiben.
Um "überhaupt" etwas zu sehen entfernt der Mechaniker den Schnee von den Cockpitscheiben.

Die Notwendigkeit einer Enteisung wird deutlich, wenn man bedenkt, dass Eis, Frost oder Schnee auf dem Flugzeug nicht nur den Auftrieb reduzieren, sondern gleichzeitig den Luftwiderstand erhöhen und das Gesamtgewicht beeinflussen. Wird es versäumt das Flugzeug zu enteisen, könnte dies im äussersten Fall zu einen kritischen Flugzustand führen.

Sobald alle Passagiere an Bord, die Türen und Frachttore geschlossen sind, kann die Enteisung beginnen. Je nach den lokalen Vorgaben erfolgt diese entweder direkt am Standplatz oder an einer dezidierten Enteisungsstation. Nachdem das Flugzeug mittels einer Checkliste konfiguriert ist, nähern sich üblicherweise pro Flugzeugseite je ein Fahrzeug und die Bodenmannschaft beginnt sogleich mit dem Enteisungsprozedere.

Am Flughafen Zürich gibt es zwei Enteisungsstationen, sogenannte "De-Icing Pads". Diese befinden sich nahe der Startbahnen und ermöglichen einen zeitnahen Abflug nach erfolgter Enteisung und eine bessere Sammlung der Enteisungsflüssigkeit.
Am Flughafen Zürich gibt es zwei Enteisungsstationen, sogenannte "De-Icing Pads". Diese befinden sich nahe der Startbahnen und ermöglichen einen zeitnahen Abflug nach erfolgter Enteisung und eine bessere Sammlung der Enteisungsflüssigkeit.

Hinter dem generellen Begriff “De-Icing” verstecken sich übrigens zwei Unterbegriffe und leicht unterschiedliche Vorgehensweisen. Diese mögen auf den ersten Blick ähnlich aussehen, unterscheiden sich jedoch mit einem kleinen, aber signifikanten Unterschied. Denn je nach Wetterbedingungen unterscheiden wir, ob das Flugzeug “nur” enteist werden muss oder eine zusätzliche Schmutzschicht benötigt wird. Dieser zweite Schritt, das sogenannten “Anti-Icing”, wird nur bei vorherrschendem Niederschlag notwendig und verhindert ein erneutes Ansetzen auf den kritischen Flugflächen. Zur einfacheren Identifikation unterscheiden sie sich übrigens auch farblich: Unabhängig vom Typ der Enteisungsflüssigkeit ist der De-Icing Schritt jeweils orange und der Anti-Icing Schritt grün eingefärbt.

An der Enteisungsstation warten bereits zwei Fahrzeuge auf uns. Wir führen die "Before De-Icing" Checkliste durch und sprechen uns per Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft ab. In kürze kann das Enteisen beginnen.
An der Enteisungsstation warten bereits zwei Fahrzeuge auf uns. Wir führen die "Before De-Icing" Checkliste durch und sprechen uns per Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft ab. In kürze kann das Enteisen beginnen.

Zurück zu unserem Flug

Nach einer kurzen Wartezeit sind wir auf die zugewiesene Enteisungsstation gerollt, haben die Checkliste abgeschlossen und uns über Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft auf das gewünschte Vorgehen geeinigt. Die Wahl der Methode hängt dabei primär von den Wetterbedingungen ab. Da in unserem Fall noch Schnee fällt, werden beide Schritte benötigen. Im ersten Schritt wird nun die dicke Schneeschicht entfernt und danach im zweiten Schritt die Schutzschicht aufgetragen. In beiden Schritten wird dabei eine Mischung aus Wasser, Glykol und anderen Zusätzen verwendet. Sie ist ungiftig und biologisch abbaubar. Die Bodenmannschaft berechnet das optimale Mischverhältnis für den nötigen Schutz bietet und gleichzeitig kostengünstig ist. Basierend auf dem Mischverhältnis und den aktuellen Wetterbedingungen können wir im Cockpit dann die sogenannte "Hold Over Time" berechnen. Diese Zeitspanne definiert, wie lange die Schutzschicht hält und die kritischen Flugflächen vor einem erneuten Ansetzen von Eis und Schnee schützt. Sie kann in sehr kalten Temperaturen oder bei starkem Niederschlag wenige Minuten, in milderen Bedingungen aber auch rund eine Stunde betragen.

Vom Cockpit aus beobachten wir, wie die Bodenmannschaft mit äusserster Sorgfalt dafür sorgt, dass wir in Kürze sicher abheben können. Diese Dauer variiert übrigens zwischen 10 und 30 Minuten, abhängig von der Grösse des Flugzeugs, der angewandten Enteisungsmethode und den aktuellen Wetterbedingungen. Üblicherweise sind bei der Enteisung eines Flugzeugs am Flughafen Zürich mindestens fünf Mitglieder der Bodenmannschaft beteiligt. Auf der einen Seite agieren die beiden Bediener der Enteisungsfahrzeuge, die hoch oben auf dem Auslegearm ihre Fahrzeuge geschickt manövrieren und behutsam das Flugzeug enteisen. Diese werden von verschiedenen Stellen unterstützt, darunter der Enteisungs-Koordinator, der den gesamten Prozess leitet, der Pad-Koordinator (unten rechts), der per Funk mit den Piloten kommuniziert, und ein De-Icing-Pad-Koordinator (unten links), der den eigentlichen Enteisungsprozess überwacht.

Fototipp

Besonders eindrückliche Aufnahmen entstehen in der Dämmerung und nachts, wenn mit einer etwas längeren Belichtungszeit aufgenommen werden kann und so ein besonderer visueller Effekt entsteht.

“SWISS Three-Alpha-Zulu, from De-Icing”

Über Funk erhalten wir alle Angaben zum soeben abgeschlossenen Prozedere und nach einer erneuten Checkliste rollen wir zur Startbahn um wenige Augenblicke später in den Morgenhimmel über ZRH abzuheben.

Flightlapse

Geniessen Sie diese Zusammenstellung von Zeitraffersequenzen der Winter OPS am Flughafen Zürich.

 

Frisch enteist starten wir in den Morgenhimmel über dem Winterwunderland.
Frisch enteist starten wir in den Morgenhimmel über dem Winterwunderland.
Traumhafte Ausblicke über den Alpenhauptkamm während der frühen Morgenstunden. Wer genau hinschaut, kann sogar das Matterhorn erkennen.
Traumhafte Ausblicke über den Alpenhauptkamm während der frühen Morgenstunden. Wer genau hinschaut, kann sogar das Matterhorn erkennen.

Über das Bild

Das Februar-Bild in meinem aktuellen Fotokalenders "Snowed-in" zeigt einen frisch verschneiten Airbus A220 am Flughafen Zürich am Tag nach intensivem Schneefall. Dieses Bild zeigt ausdrücklich, wie stark die Fliegerei dem Wetter ausgeliefert ist und besonders das Winterwetter zahlreiche Spezialverfahren für einen sicheren Flugbetrieb erfordern.

 

 

 

Aufgenommen mit einer Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF100-400 IS II USM @234mm bei ISO640, f/5.0, 1/200 Sek.


Über "Behind the Image"

In meinem Fotokalender "Up in the Sky" gewähre ich faszinierende Einblicke in meinen Alltag als Linienpilot. Diese Blogserie ergänzt den Fotokalender und erzählt die Geschichte hinter dem Moment, in dem das Bild aufgenommen wurde. Zudem bietet sie Hintergrundinformationen darüber, was sich im Cockpit ereignet hat und wie das Bild entstanden ist.

1 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Landing in Winter Wonderland (D)

In wenigen Augenblicken werden wir auf der Piste 34 in Kittilä, dem Tor zu finnisch Lappland aufsetzen. Die 2500 Meter lange Landebahn liegt jenseits des Polarkreises und ist oft mit Schnee bedeckt. Solche winterlichen Bedingungen stellen eine zusätzliche Herausforderung dar und erfordern spezielle Verfahren.

(Not) Just another day at the office

Rund fünf Stunden zuvor beginnt ein langer Arbeitstag der uns direkt ins Winter Wunderland und zur nördlichsten Destination im Streckennetz führen wird. Ziele wie diese sind eine willkommene Abwechslung in unserem Dienstplan, bieten sie doch nicht nur eine «exotisch-klingende» Destination, sondern auch eine Reihe an spannenden Herausforderungen.

Die Herausforderungen der Arktis

Doch was macht "Winterwetter" so anspruchsvoll? Am offensichtlichsten sind sicherlich die mit Schnee und Eis bedeckten Landebahnen, welche unseren Bremsweg signifikant verlängern. Zudem setzt sich der Niederschlag auf dem Flugzeug nieder. Dies ist besonders kritisch auf der Flügeloberseite, würde Frost oder gar eine Schicht Schnee für eine massiv verschlechterte Aerodynamik sorgen. Weiter beeinflusst die extreme Kälte den Höhenmesser und je näher wir dem magnetischen Nordpol kommen, desto ungenauer wird unser Kompass.

 

 

Kontaminierte Landebahn
Der Betrieb von einer kontaminierten Landebahn birgt ähnliche Herausforderungen wie im Strassenverkehr. Raue Winterbedingungen oder starke Niederschläge können die Landebahn kontaminieren und uns Piloten vor einige Herausforderungen stellen. Unter anderem ist bei kontaminierter Piste oder Rollwegen mit einem erhöhten Bremsweg aufgrund des reduzierten Reibungskoeffizienten bei gleichzeitig verschlechterter Steuerbarkeit zu rechnen. Im Fliegerjargon bedeutet «kontaminiert» übrigens, dass die Piste weder trocken noch nass, sondern zum Beispiel mit Schnee, Matsch, Eis oder stehendem Wasser bedeckt ist. Obschon herausfordernd sind das Starten und Landen von einer bedeckten Landebahn sicher, mitunter da es strengen Vorschriften unterliegt. Daher werden jede Start- und Landung im Voraus unter Berücksichtigung der herrschenden Bedingungen berechnet. Dies ermöglicht es uns, genau zu wissen, wie lang unser Landeweg sein wird oder welche Schubwerte wir benötigen, um sicher abzuheben. Es deckt auch das unwahrscheinliche Ereignis eines abgebrochenen Starts ab und stellt sicher, dass ausreichend Landebahn übrig bleibt, um anzuhalten. Obwohl die Bodenmannschaft stets unermüdlich arbeitet um die Landebahnen möglichst gut zu präparieren, ist eine vollständige Räumung nicht immer möglich und kann zu einer vorübergehenden Schliessungen der Piste oder gar des Flughafens führen.

Enteisung

Das Fliegen im Winter erfordert oft das Enteisen des Flugzeugs vor dem Start. Eis, Frost oder verbliebener Schnee auf dem Flugzeug verringern den Auftrieb, erhöhen das Gewicht sowie den Luftwiderstand. Daher ist es zwingend notwendig, solche Verunreinigungen vor dem Start zu entfernen. Sobald alle Passagiere an Bord sind, erfolgt normalerweise das Enteisungsverfahren, entweder direkt am Standplatz oder an einem speziellen Enteisungsplatz, je nach lokalen Vorgaben. Ein kleiner Ausblick auf das Bild des nächsten Monats zeigt bereits, dass sich dieses intensiv mit dem Thema Enteisung befassen wird. Weitere Details zu diesem Thema folgen in der baldigen Februarausgabe. 

Instrumentenfehler
Das Fliegen in nördlichen Gefilden beeinflusst auch unsere Instrumente. So beeinträchtigen kalte Temperaturen etwa den Höhenmesser und die Magnetfelder beeinflussen den Kompass.

 

Kalte Temperaturen
Der Höhenmesser ist im Wesentlichen ein Messgerät für den Umgebungsdruck. Er misst die umgebende "Luftsäule", die von Natur aus aufgrund variierender Temperaturen schwankt. Da die Temperatur einen direkten Einfluss auf die Luftdichte hat, beeinflusst sie auch die gemessene Luftsäule. Daher entspricht die angezeigte Höhe nur unter ISA-Standardbedingungen der tatsächlichen Höhe (wahre Höhe).

 

 

"Von warm zu kalt, wirst du nicht alt!"

Da sich Luftmoleküle je nach Temperatur ausdehnen oder zusammenziehen, kann der Höhenmesser bei wärmeren Temperaturen eine niedrigere Höhe anzeigen als tatsächlich vorhanden und umgekehrt bei kälteren Temperaturen irrtümlicherweise eine höhere Höhe. Letzteres ist besonders kritisch, da es dem Piloten suggeriert, höher zu fliegen, obwohl er tatsächlich tiefer ist. Diese Diskrepanz ist besonders entscheidend, wenn man in Wolken fliegt und sich ausschliesslich auf Instrumente verlassen muss.

 

 

Kompass Fehler

In hohen Breitengraden unterliegt das magnetische Feld starken Veränderungen, die den Kompass beeinflussen. Da die Navigation in modernen Verkehrsflugzeugen hauptsächlich auf GPS basiert, hat der Instrumentenfehler des Kompasses nur eine sekundäre Bedeutung. Doch warum gibt es eigentlich einen Kompassfehler? Die Erklärung liegt im Unterschied zwischen dem magnetischen Nordpol der Erde, der sich irgendwo im Norden von Kanada befindet, und dem geografischen Nordpol. Diese Differenz führt dazu, dass der Kompass einen Fehler namens Variation anzeigt. Dabei handelt es sich um den Winkelunterschied zwischen der vom Kompass gemessenen Richtung (zum magnetischen Nordpol) und der wahren Richtung (geografischer Nordpol). Je weiter man nach Norden kommt, desto grösser ist die Distanz zwischen den «beiden» Nordpols und somit dieser Fehler. Übrigens: Piloten finden die Informationen zur Variation für jede Position auf ihrer Luftfahrtkarte. Sie ist nach Ost oder West benannt, um die Seite des wahren Nordens anzuzeigen, auf der der Kompass-Norden liegt. Zum Beispiel beträgt die Variation auf der Thule Air Base (BGTL) an der nordwestlichen Küste Grönlands fast 42° W. Heutzutage muss die Variation etwa bei der Interpretation von Windangaben berücksichtigt werden.

 

Willkommen im Winterwunderland

Zurück zum eigentlichen Flug nach KTT. Wir haben gerade den finnischen Luftraum erreicht, und die dichten Wolkenfelder unter uns lichten sich. Während wir also im angenehm warmen Cockpit sitzen, dürfen wir Ausblicke über faszinierend schöne, jedoch sehr karge Landschaft geniessen. Erinnerungen an meine eigenen Ferien hier im hohen Norden kommen hoch, bei denen ich die Schönheit von finnisch Lappland für mich entdecken durfte. Die beinahe unendlichen, tiefgefrorenen Weiten und die surreale Schönheit von schneebedeckten Landschaften, gepaart mit der stillen Ruhe und dem bezaubernden Tanz der Nordlichter, machen für mich den faszinierenden Reiz dieser einzigartigen Region aus.

Die erste Sinkflugfreigabe durch die Flugsicherung holt mich zurück in die Gegenwart und zu den Gedanken an den bevorstehenden, sehr anspruchsvollen Anflug auf die Piste 34. Wenige Minuten später steuert mein Erster Offizier das Flugzeug präzise auf die Landebahn und vollführt eine geschmeidige Landung. Die Bremswirkung erweist sich als gut, und so rollen wir schon nach rund 1500 Metern von der Piste ab. Wie erwartet sind die Rollwege und das Vorfeld schneebedeckt. Entsprechend langsam und mit äusserster Vorsicht steuere ich das Flugzeug zum zugewiesenen Standplatz. Kurz darauf verabschieden wir unsere Gäste mit den besten Wünschen für eine wundervolle Zeit im Winterwunderland, das sie exklusiv mit Kontiki Reisen erleben werden. Mit dem letzten ausgestiegenen Passagier richtet sich unsere Aufmerksamkeit rasch auf die Vorbereitungen für den bevorstehenden Abflug und die Heimreise in die Schweiz.

 

Über das Bild

 

Das Januar-Bild in meinem aktuellen Fotokalenders "Willkommen im Winterwunderland" fängt die faszinierende Schönheit dieser unwirklichen Region ein. Das Fliegen zum Polarkreis erfordert tiefgreifendes Wissen über die einzigartigen Herausforderungen solcher Operationen, effektive Zusammenarbeit aller Beteiligten und eine kontinuierliche Aufdatierung des Flugverlaufs.

 

 

 

Aufgenommen mit einer Canon EOS R5 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, ISO100, f/6.3, 1/320 Sek.


Über "Behind the Image"

In meinem Fotokalender "Up in the Sky" gewähre ich faszinierende Einblicke in meinen Alltag als Linienpilot. Diese Blogserie ergänzt den Fotokalender und erzählt die Geschichte hinter dem Moment, in dem das Bild aufgenommen wurde. Zudem bietet sie Hintergrundinformationen darüber, was sich im Cockpit ereignet hat und wie das Bild entstanden ist.

3 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Landing in Winter Wonderland

We are perfectly aligned for a touchdown at Kittilä’s runway 34, the gateway to Finnish Lapland. Situated beyond the Arctic Circle, this 2500m long runway is often covered in snow. The wintery condition presents an additional challenge to the flight crews, necessitating special procedures.

(Not) Just another day at the office

Around five hours earlier, a long workday begins that will take us directly to the Winter Wonderland and the northernmost destination in our route network. Destinations like these provide a welcome change in our schedule, offering not only an "exotic-sounding" destination but also a series of exciting challenges.

 

The Challenges of Flying beyond the Arctic Circle

But what makes "winter weather" so demanding? Most notably, snow and ice-covered runways significantly lengthen our braking distance. Additionally, precipitation accumulates on the aircraft. This is particularly critical on the upper wing surface, as frost or a layer of snow could severely degrade aerodynamics. Furthermore, the extreme cold affects the altimeter, and as we approach the magnetic North Pole, our compass becomes increasingly inaccurate.

 

Contaminated Runway

Operating from a contaminated runway offers similar challenges as for roads. The reduced friction coefficient increases stopping distance and impairs controllability. However, taking off and landing from a contaminated runway is certified and completely safe. Especially harsh winter conditions or an intense downpour may render the runway "contaminated. " This means that its surface is neither dry nor wet but is covered with snow, slush, ice, or standing water to name just a few. Although airport ground staff works tirelessly to treat runways, complete clearance may not always be possible, leading to temporary closures. In commercial aviation, everything is based on limitations, rules, and procedures. Therefore every takeoff and landing is calculated beforehand with the prevailing conditions. It allows us to accurately know how long our landing roll will be or what thrust settings we need to safely take off. It certainly also covers the unlikely event of an aborted takeoff and assures sufficient remaining runway to come to a stop.

De-Icing

Flying in cold temperatures often necessitates de-icing. The build-up of ice, frost, or lingering snow can modify the wing and tail shapes, diminishing lift while increasing weight and drag. Hence, it's imperative to eliminate these contaminants before takeoff. Once all passengers are on board, the de-icing procedure will either occur at the parking position, or the pilots will taxi to a dedicated de-icing pad to initiate this process. Stay tuned for the February issue, where I'll delve deeper into the intricacies of de-icing an aircraft.

 

Instrument Errors

Flying in the Arctic affects our instruments. Cold temperatures impact the altimeter, while the variation influences the magnetic compass.

 

Cold Temperatures

The altimeter, a pressure gauge, is inherently susceptible to temperature deviations. An error occurs when the altimeter indicates the same altitude irrespective of the temperature, while the actual height (true altitude) differs due to changes in air density.

 

"From Warm to Cold, You Won't Get Old!"

 

In warmer temperatures, the altimeter may indicate a lower altitude than actual, and in colder temperatures, it may erroneously indicate a higher altitude. This discrepancy is crucial when flying in clouds and relying solely on instruments.

 

 

Compass Error

Changes in the magnetic field at high latitudes impact the compass. Although the magnetic compass holds less significance in modern airliners, given the prevalence of GPS equipment and gyroscopes in today's navigation, it remains crucial to consider the variation – the angular difference between the compass and true direction. Did you know that the earth's north magnetic pole is located somewhere to the north of Canada and not at the true North Pole? This difference causes the compass to indicate an error called variation. It is the angular difference between the direction measured by the compass (towards the magnetic north pole) and the true direction (geographic north pole). And the further north you get, the more error you experience. Pilots find the information about the variation for any position on their aviation chart. It is named east or west to indicate the side of the true north on which the compass north lies. For instance, at Thule Air Base (BGTL) on Greenland's northwest coast, the variation is almost 42° W.

 

Welcome to Winter Wonderland

As we enter Finnish airspace, the sky clears, unveiling breathtaking views of a frozen world below. The cold beauty is both captivating and challenging, with an otherworldly allure. For me, Finnish Lapland embodies the essence of a winter wonderland. The surreal beauty of snow-covered landscapes and frozen expanses, paired with the serene stillness and the enchanting dance of the Northern Lights, encapsulates the captivating allure of this Arctic region.

Anticipating a challenging approach, we complete our meticulous approach preparations well in advance and maintain full focus, gearing up to execute an ILS approach for a landing on runway 34. Minutes later my First Officer skillfully pilots the aircraft towards the runway, executing a precise and smooth touch down followed by a swift deceleration. The braking action proves excellent, allowing us to promptly vacate through one of the earliest exits. As expected, the tarmac and taxiways exhibit more contamination, a consequence of the ground staff's primary focus on runway clearance. Navigating with caution, I slowly taxi the aircraft to our assigned stand. Shortly after, our guests disembark, and we bid them farewell, extending our best wishes for a delightful time in Winter Wonderland with Kontiki Reisen. With the last passenger disembarked, our attention swiftly shifts to preparing our Airbus A220 for the journey home.

About the image

The January image in the 2024 edition of my photo calendar, titled "Welcome to Winter Wonderland," encapsulates the mesmerizing cold beauty of this otherworldly region. Flying to the Arctic Circle requires profound knowledge of the unique challenges posed by such operations, effective crew coordination, and continuous flight monitoring.

 

Shot on a Canon EOS R5 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, ISO100, f/6.3, 1/320sec


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.

 

0 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Sailing above Sand (E)

As we journey home from Johannesburg, the breathtaking sight of a sunrise over the Sahara Desert unfolds before us, casting a golden hue over the seemingly endless dunes. The first rays of the new day illuminate this vast expanse, revealing a stark beauty in the midst of a desolate and inhospitable environment. Yet, despite the mesmerizing scenery, our focus remains on the intricate dance of technology and skill needed to traverse this remote region safely.

Perhaps it was the fragrance of a steaming cup of coffee, or perhaps my "inner clock" whispering that a vibrant sunrise awaits just beyond the sun visor. I relish the flight as a passenger, casting my gaze beyond the wing across the boundless expanse of the Sahara, a canvas of memories from my days as a long-haul pilot. En route to distant metropolises, I soared above lands entirely unfamiliar to me, traversing regions almost devoid of human presence. One such realm is the expansive tapestry of the Sahara, cutting across Africa north of the equator in all its width. From the Atlantic Ocean to the shores of the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, this colossal desert unfolds. Contrary to prevailing beliefs, the Sahara is not merely an infinite abyss of sand. A tapestry of diversity spanning millions of square miles across northern Africa. Mountains stand sentinel, ancient volcanoes slumber in their dormant grace, salt flats stretch like glistening mirrors, and vast plains beckon with a quiet majesty. Amidst this enchanting panorama, the illustrious sand dunes dance, an ever-shifting ballet choreographed by the persistent caress of trade winds, sculpting ephemeral masterpieces in the golden sands.

The first rays of the new day illuminate the vast expanse, revealing a stark beauty amid a desolate and inhospitable environment. As my eyes feast on the boundless view, my thoughts wander into the cockpit where flying over such remote areas presents unique challenges for pilots. Unlike densely populated regions with well-established air traffic control systems, remote areas often lack ground-based navigation aids. Pilots must rely on their own skills and experience to safely navigate these regions.

Wayfinding

Embarking on the journey of becoming a pilot, I was first taught how to navigate by visual references. I had to devise a flight plan consisting of landmarks, such as roads, lakes, or settlements, and connecting them to get to the destination I was tasked with. Yet, as I piloted airliners across the globe, veiled by the night and cloaked in clouds that obscured these earthly signposts, the celestial ballet demanded a more nuanced dance of navigation. In the infancy of aviation, hundreds of light beacons were placed on top of mountains to guide the first airmail flight across the American continent, connecting New York with San Francisco. These luminous sentinels, etching trails in the firmament, paved the way for the airborne pioneers. With time, their terrestrial glow yielded to the subtler hum of radio beacons (NDB, VOR), transmitting whispers of their position (bearing and distance) through evolved instruments on the flight deck. However, those ground-based navigation aids are maintenance intensive and above all need solid ground to stand on, making them less of an option in remote areas. Before the invention of GPS, inertial navigation systems (INS) and a long-range radio navigation system (LORAN) were developed to provide independent position information and allow safe and accurate passage of those areas. Today, pilots rely heavily on satellite-based navigation systems. The GPS provides precise positioning and accurate navigation even in the absence of any ground-based navigation aid. In the contemporary skies, the once-luminous beacons have metamorphosed into cryptic five-letter waypoints—coordinates etched in the air, forming a lexicon along the airways that crisscross continents and connect the beating hearts of cities.

Communication in Remote Areas

The sparse skyways above the surreal landscapes are densely treaded at certain times. Just as with navigation, communication, too, finds itself subject to the boundaries of physics. While we usually communicate through shortwave radio (VHF), remote regions require us to rely on a combination of longwave and text communication. The high-frequency (HF) radio and the CPDLC (Controller-Pilot Data Link Communications) are the lifelines that connect us to the outside world. HF radio allows us to communicate with air traffic control in a remote area, even if they are hundreds of miles away. CPDLC, on the other hand, facilitates data link communication between pilots and air traffic controllers, easing our workload while ensuring a streamlined exchange of essential information. As the short-range radios are rendered useless to communicate with air traffic control, we utilize them for pilot-to-pilot communication. This adds another layer of collaboration and safety. In the solitude of the cockpit, pilots share information, insights, and observations, enhancing situational awareness. This peer-to-peer communication fosters a sense of camaraderie among aviators navigating the challenging airspace above the Sahara.

In the Cockpit

While navigating through remote areas pilots are engaged in a myriad of tasks to ensure a smooth and safe flight. Continuous monitoring of the aircraft's systems, weather conditions, and navigation instruments is paramount. The ever-changing nature of the skies requires adaptability, with pilots ready to adjust course and altitude based on real-time information.

Moreover, pilots play a crucial role in managing fuel consumption, optimizing routes for efficiency, and making strategic decisions based on weather patterns. As we sail above the sand, the cockpit becomes a command center where every decision is calculated and every action meticulously executed.

About the image

The title image of 2024 edition of my photo calendar “Sailing above Sand” is a testament to the synergy between human skill and technological marvels. Navigating remote areas demands a harmonious blend of precise navigation, effective communication, and vigilant task management.

 

Shot on a Sony 7S + 24-105mm F4 G SSM @24mm, ISO125, f/5.6, 1/320sec


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.

 

Behind the Image: Snowed-in (E)

A passing winter storm has blanketed Zurich Airport in heavy snow, resulting in a temporary closure. Following the diligent work of the snow removal team, it is now time to resume flights. Before this Airbus A220 can take to the skies again, the residual snow on its wings and fuselage must be removed. It is patiently waiting for its turn at the de-icing pad, a bit like a beauty makeover.

Why is De-Icing necessary? Well, Flight Safety First!

Mrs. Holle was extremely diligent! Tirelessly, she shook out her snow pillows, and the thick snowflakes fell from the sky. They enveloped Switzerland in a fairytale winter dress, albeit not without causing a bit of chaos in public transport. Especially at Zurich Airport, the snow removal teams could hardly keep up, trying to clear the runways and taxiways. Thanks to their relentless efforts, normalcy gradually returned the next day. Under sunny skies and frosty temperatures, the airport offered spectators an impressive spectacle: the snow-covered planes, treated by de-icing vehicles, sparkled in the sunlight. Like this Airbus A220, patiently waiting to be freed from its thick snow cover before takeoff. Have you ever watched a plane being de-iced, and do you know why this process is necessary?

 

For several years, the aviation industry has adhered to the so-called "clean aircraft concept." This safety initiative ensures that before takeoff, frozen deposits are removed not only from the fuselage but especially from the critical flight surfaces. These include the upper side of the wings, as well as the rudder and elevators.

 

In order to see anything at all, the mechanic removes the snow from the cockpit windows.
In order to see anything at all, the mechanic removes the snow from the cockpit windows.

The necessity of de-icing becomes apparent when considering that ice, frost, or snow on the aircraft not only reduce lift but also simultaneously increases drag and the overall weight. Neglecting to de-ice the aircraft could, in extreme cases, lead to a critical flight condition.

Once all passengers are on board, and the doors and cargo doors are closed, de-icing can commence. Depending on local regulations, this may occur either directly at the gate or at a designated de-icing pad. Pilots use checklists to configure and then the procedure can begin. Typically, a vehicle approaches each side of the aircraft, and the ground crew promptly begins spraying the aircraft.

At Zurich Airport, there are two de-icing areas, known as "De-Icing Pads." These are located close to the runways, facilitating a prompt departure after de-icing and better containment of the de-icing fluid.
At Zurich Airport, there are two de-icing areas, known as "De-Icing Pads." These are located close to the runways, facilitating a prompt departure after de-icing and better containment of the de-icing fluid.

Behind the general term "De-Icing," there are, in fact, two subcategories. While they may appear similar at first glance, they differ with a small but significant distinction. Depending on weather conditions, we determine whether the aircraft needs only de-icing or requires an additional protective layer. This second step, known as "Anti-Icing," becomes necessary only in the presence of precipitation and prevents the reformation of ice on the critical flight surfaces. To facilitate identification, they are also distinguished by color: Regardless of the type of de-icing fluid, the de-icing step is always marked in orange, while the anti-icing step is colored green.

At the de-icing station, two vehicles are already waiting for us. We completed the "Before De-Icing" checklist and communicated with the ground crew via radio. Soon the de-icing will commence.
At the de-icing station, two vehicles are already waiting for us. We completed the "Before De-Icing" checklist and communicated with the ground crew via radio. Soon the de-icing will commence.

Back to our flight

After a short wait, we taxied to the assigned de-icing pad, completed the checklist, and coordinated the procedure with the ground crew via radio. The method chosen primarily depends on the weather conditions. In our case, since it's still snowing, both steps are required. In the first step, the thick layer of snow is removed, and then, in the second step, a protective layer is applied. In both steps, a mixture of water, glycol, and other additives is used. This mixture is non-toxic and biodegradable. The ground crew calculates the optimal ratio that provides the necessary protection while being cost-effective. Based on this ratio and the current weather conditions, we can calculate the "Hold Over Time" in the cockpit. This timeframe determines how long the protective layer will last, shielding the critical flight surfaces from the reformation of ice and snow. It can range from a few minutes in very cold temperatures or heavy precipitation to around an hour in milder conditions.

From the cockpit, we watch the ground crew treating our aircraft with utmost care ensuring that we can take off safely shortly. This duration, by the way, varies between 10 and 30 minutes, depending on the size of the aircraft, the de-icing method applied, and the current weather conditions. Typically, during the de-icing of an aircraft at Zurich Airport, at least five members of the ground crew are involved. On one side, the two operators of the de-icing vehicles who skillfully maneuver their equipment high above on the articulated arm to delicately spray the aircraft. They are supported by various positions, including the De-Icing Coordinator, overseeing the entire process, the Pad Coordinator (bottom right), communicating with the pilots via radio, and a De-Icing Pad Coordinator (bottom left), monitoring the actual de-icing process.

Photo Tip

Especially impressive shots are captured during twilight and at night when using a slightly longer exposure time, creating a distinctive visual effect.

“SWISS Three-Alpha-Zulu, from De-Icing”

Over the radio, we receive all the details about the just completed procedure. After a final checklist, we taxi to the runway, ready to take off into the morning sky above ZRH in a matter of moments.

 

Flightlapse

Enjoy this collection of timelapse sequences of the winter ops at ZRH.

De-iced and ready, we take off into the morning sky above the winter wonderland.
De-iced and ready, we take off into the morning sky above the winter wonderland.
Dreamy views over the main Alpine ridge during the early morning hours. Those who look closely might even recognize the Matterhorn.
Dreamy views over the main Alpine ridge during the early morning hours. Those who look closely might even recognize the Matterhorn.

About the Image

The February image in my current photo calendar "Snowed-in" features a freshly snow-covered Airbus A220 at Zurich Airport, taken the day after intense snowfall. This image explicitly illustrates how aviation is significantly influenced by weather conditions, and especially winter weather necessitates numerous special procedures to ensure safe flight operations.

 

Captured with a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF100-400 IS II USM @234mm at ISO 640, f/5.0, and 1/200 sec.


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.

0 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Snowed-in (D)

Frau Holle war äusserst fleissig! Unermüdlich schüttelte sie ihre Schneekissen aus und die dicke Schneeflocken fielen vom Himmel. Sie hüllten die Schweiz in ein märchenhaftes Winterkleid allerdings nicht ohne dabei im öffentlichen Verkehr für das ein oder andere Chaos zu sorgen. Insbesondere am Flughafen Zürich kamen die Schneeräumtruppen zwischenzeitlich kaum noch hinterher, die Pisten und Rollwege freizuräumen. Dank ihrer unermüdlichen Arbeit kehrte am Tag danach allmählich wieder Normalität ein. Bei Sonnenschein und frostigen Temperaturen bot sich den Zuschauern am Flughafen ein beeindruckendes Schauspiel: Die schneebedeckten Flugzeuge, die von den Enteisungsfahrzeugen bearbeitet wurden, glitzerten im Sonnenlicht. So auch dieser Airbus A220, der vor dem Abflug geduldig darauf wartet von seiner dicken Schneedecke befreit zu werden. Hast du schon einmal ein Flugzeug beim Enteisen beobachtet und weisst du, warum dieser Vorgang überhaupt notwendig ist?

Warum wird überhaupt enteist? Flight Safety First!

Seit einigen Jahren gilt in der Luftfahrt das sogenannte "clean aircraft concept". Dieses Sicherheitsbestreben stellt sicher, dass vor dem Abflug gefrorenen Ablagerungen vom Rumpf, inssondere aber von den kritischen Flugflächen entfernt werden. Hierzu zählen die Flügeloberseite, sowie das Seiten- und Höhenruder.

Vor jedem Abflug begutachtet einer der beiden Piloten das Flugzeug. Nebst generellen Beschädigungen inspiziert er/sie dabei besonders die Triebwerke und Reifen. Weiter wird geprüft, ob sich auf den kritsichen Flugflächen gefrorene Ablagungen befinden.
Vor jedem Abflug begutachtet einer der beiden Piloten das Flugzeug. Nebst generellen Beschädigungen inspiziert er/sie dabei besonders die Triebwerke und Reifen. Weiter wird geprüft, ob sich auf den kritsichen Flugflächen gefrorene Ablagungen befinden.
Um "überhaupt" etwas zu sehen entfernt der Mechaniker den Schnee von den Cockpitscheiben.
Um "überhaupt" etwas zu sehen entfernt der Mechaniker den Schnee von den Cockpitscheiben.

Die Notwendigkeit einer Enteisung wird deutlich, wenn man bedenkt, dass Eis, Frost oder Schnee auf dem Flugzeug nicht nur den Auftrieb reduzieren, sondern gleichzeitig den Luftwiderstand erhöhen und das Gesamtgewicht beeinflussen. Wird es versäumt das Flugzeug zu enteisen, könnte dies im äussersten Fall zu einen kritischen Flugzustand führen.

Sobald alle Passagiere an Bord, die Türen und Frachttore geschlossen sind, kann die Enteisung beginnen. Je nach den lokalen Vorgaben erfolgt diese entweder direkt am Standplatz oder an einer dezidierten Enteisungsstation. Nachdem das Flugzeug mittels einer Checkliste konfiguriert ist, nähern sich üblicherweise pro Flugzeugseite je ein Fahrzeug und die Bodenmannschaft beginnt sogleich mit dem Enteisungsprozedere.

Am Flughafen Zürich gibt es zwei Enteisungsstationen, sogenannte "De-Icing Pads". Diese befinden sich nahe der Startbahnen und ermöglichen einen zeitnahen Abflug nach erfolgter Enteisung und eine bessere Sammlung der Enteisungsflüssigkeit.
Am Flughafen Zürich gibt es zwei Enteisungsstationen, sogenannte "De-Icing Pads". Diese befinden sich nahe der Startbahnen und ermöglichen einen zeitnahen Abflug nach erfolgter Enteisung und eine bessere Sammlung der Enteisungsflüssigkeit.

Hinter dem generellen Begriff “De-Icing” verstecken sich übrigens zwei Unterbegriffe und leicht unterschiedliche Vorgehensweisen. Diese mögen auf den ersten Blick ähnlich aussehen, unterscheiden sich jedoch mit einem kleinen, aber signifikanten Unterschied. Denn je nach Wetterbedingungen unterscheiden wir, ob das Flugzeug “nur” enteist werden muss oder eine zusätzliche Schmutzschicht benötigt wird. Dieser zweite Schritt, das sogenannten “Anti-Icing”, wird nur bei vorherrschendem Niederschlag notwendig und verhindert ein erneutes Ansetzen auf den kritischen Flugflächen. Zur einfacheren Identifikation unterscheiden sie sich übrigens auch farblich: Unabhängig vom Typ der Enteisungsflüssigkeit ist der De-Icing Schritt jeweils orange und der Anti-Icing Schritt grün eingefärbt.

An der Enteisungsstation warten bereits zwei Fahrzeuge auf uns. Wir führen die "Before De-Icing" Checkliste durch und sprechen uns per Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft ab. In kürze kann das Enteisen beginnen.
An der Enteisungsstation warten bereits zwei Fahrzeuge auf uns. Wir führen die "Before De-Icing" Checkliste durch und sprechen uns per Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft ab. In kürze kann das Enteisen beginnen.

Zurück zu unserem Flug

Nach einer kurzen Wartezeit sind wir auf die zugewiesene Enteisungsstation gerollt, haben die Checkliste abgeschlossen und uns über Funk mit der Bodenmannschaft auf das gewünschte Vorgehen geeinigt. Die Wahl der Methode hängt dabei primär von den Wetterbedingungen ab. Da in unserem Fall noch Schnee fällt, werden beide Schritte benötigen. Im ersten Schritt wird nun die dicke Schneeschicht entfernt und danach im zweiten Schritt die Schutzschicht aufgetragen. In beiden Schritten wird dabei eine Mischung aus Wasser, Glykol und anderen Zusätzen verwendet. Sie ist ungiftig und biologisch abbaubar. Die Bodenmannschaft berechnet das optimale Mischverhältnis für den nötigen Schutz bietet und gleichzeitig kostengünstig ist. Basierend auf dem Mischverhältnis und den aktuellen Wetterbedingungen können wir im Cockpit dann die sogenannte "Hold Over Time" berechnen. Diese Zeitspanne definiert, wie lange die Schutzschicht hält und die kritischen Flugflächen vor einem erneuten Ansetzen von Eis und Schnee schützt. Sie kann in sehr kalten Temperaturen oder bei starkem Niederschlag wenige Minuten, in milderen Bedingungen aber auch rund eine Stunde betragen.

Vom Cockpit aus beobachten wir, wie die Bodenmannschaft mit äusserster Sorgfalt dafür sorgt, dass wir in Kürze sicher abheben können. Diese Dauer variiert übrigens zwischen 10 und 30 Minuten, abhängig von der Grösse des Flugzeugs, der angewandten Enteisungsmethode und den aktuellen Wetterbedingungen. Üblicherweise sind bei der Enteisung eines Flugzeugs am Flughafen Zürich mindestens fünf Mitglieder der Bodenmannschaft beteiligt. Auf der einen Seite agieren die beiden Bediener der Enteisungsfahrzeuge, die hoch oben auf dem Auslegearm ihre Fahrzeuge geschickt manövrieren und behutsam das Flugzeug enteisen. Diese werden von verschiedenen Stellen unterstützt, darunter der Enteisungs-Koordinator, der den gesamten Prozess leitet, der Pad-Koordinator (unten rechts), der per Funk mit den Piloten kommuniziert, und ein De-Icing-Pad-Koordinator (unten links), der den eigentlichen Enteisungsprozess überwacht.

Fototipp

Besonders eindrückliche Aufnahmen entstehen in der Dämmerung und nachts, wenn mit einer etwas längeren Belichtungszeit aufgenommen werden kann und so ein besonderer visueller Effekt entsteht.

“SWISS Three-Alpha-Zulu, from De-Icing”

Über Funk erhalten wir alle Angaben zum soeben abgeschlossenen Prozedere und nach einer erneuten Checkliste rollen wir zur Startbahn um wenige Augenblicke später in den Morgenhimmel über ZRH abzuheben.

Flightlapse

Geniessen Sie diese Zusammenstellung von Zeitraffersequenzen der Winter OPS am Flughafen Zürich.

 

Frisch enteist starten wir in den Morgenhimmel über dem Winterwunderland.
Frisch enteist starten wir in den Morgenhimmel über dem Winterwunderland.
Traumhafte Ausblicke über den Alpenhauptkamm während der frühen Morgenstunden. Wer genau hinschaut, kann sogar das Matterhorn erkennen.
Traumhafte Ausblicke über den Alpenhauptkamm während der frühen Morgenstunden. Wer genau hinschaut, kann sogar das Matterhorn erkennen.

Über das Bild

Das Februar-Bild in meinem aktuellen Fotokalenders "Snowed-in" zeigt einen frisch verschneiten Airbus A220 am Flughafen Zürich am Tag nach intensivem Schneefall. Dieses Bild zeigt ausdrücklich, wie stark die Fliegerei dem Wetter ausgeliefert ist und besonders das Winterwetter zahlreiche Spezialverfahren für einen sicheren Flugbetrieb erfordern.

 

 

 

Aufgenommen mit einer Canon EOS 5D Mark IV + Canon EF100-400 IS II USM @234mm bei ISO640, f/5.0, 1/200 Sek.


Über "Behind the Image"

In meinem Fotokalender "Up in the Sky" gewähre ich faszinierende Einblicke in meinen Alltag als Linienpilot. Diese Blogserie ergänzt den Fotokalender und erzählt die Geschichte hinter dem Moment, in dem das Bild aufgenommen wurde. Zudem bietet sie Hintergrundinformationen darüber, was sich im Cockpit ereignet hat und wie das Bild entstanden ist.

1 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Landing in Winter Wonderland (D)

In wenigen Augenblicken werden wir auf der Piste 34 in Kittilä, dem Tor zu finnisch Lappland aufsetzen. Die 2500 Meter lange Landebahn liegt jenseits des Polarkreises und ist oft mit Schnee bedeckt. Solche winterlichen Bedingungen stellen eine zusätzliche Herausforderung dar und erfordern spezielle Verfahren.

(Not) Just another day at the office

Rund fünf Stunden zuvor beginnt ein langer Arbeitstag der uns direkt ins Winter Wunderland und zur nördlichsten Destination im Streckennetz führen wird. Ziele wie diese sind eine willkommene Abwechslung in unserem Dienstplan, bieten sie doch nicht nur eine «exotisch-klingende» Destination, sondern auch eine Reihe an spannenden Herausforderungen.

Die Herausforderungen der Arktis

Doch was macht "Winterwetter" so anspruchsvoll? Am offensichtlichsten sind sicherlich die mit Schnee und Eis bedeckten Landebahnen, welche unseren Bremsweg signifikant verlängern. Zudem setzt sich der Niederschlag auf dem Flugzeug nieder. Dies ist besonders kritisch auf der Flügeloberseite, würde Frost oder gar eine Schicht Schnee für eine massiv verschlechterte Aerodynamik sorgen. Weiter beeinflusst die extreme Kälte den Höhenmesser und je näher wir dem magnetischen Nordpol kommen, desto ungenauer wird unser Kompass.

 

 

Kontaminierte Landebahn
Der Betrieb von einer kontaminierten Landebahn birgt ähnliche Herausforderungen wie im Strassenverkehr. Raue Winterbedingungen oder starke Niederschläge können die Landebahn kontaminieren und uns Piloten vor einige Herausforderungen stellen. Unter anderem ist bei kontaminierter Piste oder Rollwegen mit einem erhöhten Bremsweg aufgrund des reduzierten Reibungskoeffizienten bei gleichzeitig verschlechterter Steuerbarkeit zu rechnen. Im Fliegerjargon bedeutet «kontaminiert» übrigens, dass die Piste weder trocken noch nass, sondern zum Beispiel mit Schnee, Matsch, Eis oder stehendem Wasser bedeckt ist. Obschon herausfordernd sind das Starten und Landen von einer bedeckten Landebahn sicher, mitunter da es strengen Vorschriften unterliegt. Daher werden jede Start- und Landung im Voraus unter Berücksichtigung der herrschenden Bedingungen berechnet. Dies ermöglicht es uns, genau zu wissen, wie lang unser Landeweg sein wird oder welche Schubwerte wir benötigen, um sicher abzuheben. Es deckt auch das unwahrscheinliche Ereignis eines abgebrochenen Starts ab und stellt sicher, dass ausreichend Landebahn übrig bleibt, um anzuhalten. Obwohl die Bodenmannschaft stets unermüdlich arbeitet um die Landebahnen möglichst gut zu präparieren, ist eine vollständige Räumung nicht immer möglich und kann zu einer vorübergehenden Schliessungen der Piste oder gar des Flughafens führen.

Enteisung

Das Fliegen im Winter erfordert oft das Enteisen des Flugzeugs vor dem Start. Eis, Frost oder verbliebener Schnee auf dem Flugzeug verringern den Auftrieb, erhöhen das Gewicht sowie den Luftwiderstand. Daher ist es zwingend notwendig, solche Verunreinigungen vor dem Start zu entfernen. Sobald alle Passagiere an Bord sind, erfolgt normalerweise das Enteisungsverfahren, entweder direkt am Standplatz oder an einem speziellen Enteisungsplatz, je nach lokalen Vorgaben. Ein kleiner Ausblick auf das Bild des nächsten Monats zeigt bereits, dass sich dieses intensiv mit dem Thema Enteisung befassen wird. Weitere Details zu diesem Thema folgen in der baldigen Februarausgabe. 

Instrumentenfehler
Das Fliegen in nördlichen Gefilden beeinflusst auch unsere Instrumente. So beeinträchtigen kalte Temperaturen etwa den Höhenmesser und die Magnetfelder beeinflussen den Kompass.

 

Kalte Temperaturen
Der Höhenmesser ist im Wesentlichen ein Messgerät für den Umgebungsdruck. Er misst die umgebende "Luftsäule", die von Natur aus aufgrund variierender Temperaturen schwankt. Da die Temperatur einen direkten Einfluss auf die Luftdichte hat, beeinflusst sie auch die gemessene Luftsäule. Daher entspricht die angezeigte Höhe nur unter ISA-Standardbedingungen der tatsächlichen Höhe (wahre Höhe).

 

 

"Von warm zu kalt, wirst du nicht alt!"

Da sich Luftmoleküle je nach Temperatur ausdehnen oder zusammenziehen, kann der Höhenmesser bei wärmeren Temperaturen eine niedrigere Höhe anzeigen als tatsächlich vorhanden und umgekehrt bei kälteren Temperaturen irrtümlicherweise eine höhere Höhe. Letzteres ist besonders kritisch, da es dem Piloten suggeriert, höher zu fliegen, obwohl er tatsächlich tiefer ist. Diese Diskrepanz ist besonders entscheidend, wenn man in Wolken fliegt und sich ausschliesslich auf Instrumente verlassen muss.

 

 

Kompass Fehler

In hohen Breitengraden unterliegt das magnetische Feld starken Veränderungen, die den Kompass beeinflussen. Da die Navigation in modernen Verkehrsflugzeugen hauptsächlich auf GPS basiert, hat der Instrumentenfehler des Kompasses nur eine sekundäre Bedeutung. Doch warum gibt es eigentlich einen Kompassfehler? Die Erklärung liegt im Unterschied zwischen dem magnetischen Nordpol der Erde, der sich irgendwo im Norden von Kanada befindet, und dem geografischen Nordpol. Diese Differenz führt dazu, dass der Kompass einen Fehler namens Variation anzeigt. Dabei handelt es sich um den Winkelunterschied zwischen der vom Kompass gemessenen Richtung (zum magnetischen Nordpol) und der wahren Richtung (geografischer Nordpol). Je weiter man nach Norden kommt, desto grösser ist die Distanz zwischen den «beiden» Nordpols und somit dieser Fehler. Übrigens: Piloten finden die Informationen zur Variation für jede Position auf ihrer Luftfahrtkarte. Sie ist nach Ost oder West benannt, um die Seite des wahren Nordens anzuzeigen, auf der der Kompass-Norden liegt. Zum Beispiel beträgt die Variation auf der Thule Air Base (BGTL) an der nordwestlichen Küste Grönlands fast 42° W. Heutzutage muss die Variation etwa bei der Interpretation von Windangaben berücksichtigt werden.

 

Willkommen im Winterwunderland

Zurück zum eigentlichen Flug nach KTT. Wir haben gerade den finnischen Luftraum erreicht, und die dichten Wolkenfelder unter uns lichten sich. Während wir also im angenehm warmen Cockpit sitzen, dürfen wir Ausblicke über faszinierend schöne, jedoch sehr karge Landschaft geniessen. Erinnerungen an meine eigenen Ferien hier im hohen Norden kommen hoch, bei denen ich die Schönheit von finnisch Lappland für mich entdecken durfte. Die beinahe unendlichen, tiefgefrorenen Weiten und die surreale Schönheit von schneebedeckten Landschaften, gepaart mit der stillen Ruhe und dem bezaubernden Tanz der Nordlichter, machen für mich den faszinierenden Reiz dieser einzigartigen Region aus.

Die erste Sinkflugfreigabe durch die Flugsicherung holt mich zurück in die Gegenwart und zu den Gedanken an den bevorstehenden, sehr anspruchsvollen Anflug auf die Piste 34. Wenige Minuten später steuert mein Erster Offizier das Flugzeug präzise auf die Landebahn und vollführt eine geschmeidige Landung. Die Bremswirkung erweist sich als gut, und so rollen wir schon nach rund 1500 Metern von der Piste ab. Wie erwartet sind die Rollwege und das Vorfeld schneebedeckt. Entsprechend langsam und mit äusserster Vorsicht steuere ich das Flugzeug zum zugewiesenen Standplatz. Kurz darauf verabschieden wir unsere Gäste mit den besten Wünschen für eine wundervolle Zeit im Winterwunderland, das sie exklusiv mit Kontiki Reisen erleben werden. Mit dem letzten ausgestiegenen Passagier richtet sich unsere Aufmerksamkeit rasch auf die Vorbereitungen für den bevorstehenden Abflug und die Heimreise in die Schweiz.

 

Über das Bild

 

Das Januar-Bild in meinem aktuellen Fotokalenders "Willkommen im Winterwunderland" fängt die faszinierende Schönheit dieser unwirklichen Region ein. Das Fliegen zum Polarkreis erfordert tiefgreifendes Wissen über die einzigartigen Herausforderungen solcher Operationen, effektive Zusammenarbeit aller Beteiligten und eine kontinuierliche Aufdatierung des Flugverlaufs.

 

 

 

Aufgenommen mit einer Canon EOS R5 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, ISO100, f/6.3, 1/320 Sek.


Über "Behind the Image"

In meinem Fotokalender "Up in the Sky" gewähre ich faszinierende Einblicke in meinen Alltag als Linienpilot. Diese Blogserie ergänzt den Fotokalender und erzählt die Geschichte hinter dem Moment, in dem das Bild aufgenommen wurde. Zudem bietet sie Hintergrundinformationen darüber, was sich im Cockpit ereignet hat und wie das Bild entstanden ist.

3 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Landing in Winter Wonderland

We are perfectly aligned for a touchdown at Kittilä’s runway 34, the gateway to Finnish Lapland. Situated beyond the Arctic Circle, this 2500m long runway is often covered in snow. The wintery condition presents an additional challenge to the flight crews, necessitating special procedures.

(Not) Just another day at the office

Around five hours earlier, a long workday begins that will take us directly to the Winter Wonderland and the northernmost destination in our route network. Destinations like these provide a welcome change in our schedule, offering not only an "exotic-sounding" destination but also a series of exciting challenges.

 

The Challenges of Flying beyond the Arctic Circle

But what makes "winter weather" so demanding? Most notably, snow and ice-covered runways significantly lengthen our braking distance. Additionally, precipitation accumulates on the aircraft. This is particularly critical on the upper wing surface, as frost or a layer of snow could severely degrade aerodynamics. Furthermore, the extreme cold affects the altimeter, and as we approach the magnetic North Pole, our compass becomes increasingly inaccurate.

 

Contaminated Runway

Operating from a contaminated runway offers similar challenges as for roads. The reduced friction coefficient increases stopping distance and impairs controllability. However, taking off and landing from a contaminated runway is certified and completely safe. Especially harsh winter conditions or an intense downpour may render the runway "contaminated. " This means that its surface is neither dry nor wet but is covered with snow, slush, ice, or standing water to name just a few. Although airport ground staff works tirelessly to treat runways, complete clearance may not always be possible, leading to temporary closures. In commercial aviation, everything is based on limitations, rules, and procedures. Therefore every takeoff and landing is calculated beforehand with the prevailing conditions. It allows us to accurately know how long our landing roll will be or what thrust settings we need to safely take off. It certainly also covers the unlikely event of an aborted takeoff and assures sufficient remaining runway to come to a stop.

De-Icing

Flying in cold temperatures often necessitates de-icing. The build-up of ice, frost, or lingering snow can modify the wing and tail shapes, diminishing lift while increasing weight and drag. Hence, it's imperative to eliminate these contaminants before takeoff. Once all passengers are on board, the de-icing procedure will either occur at the parking position, or the pilots will taxi to a dedicated de-icing pad to initiate this process. Stay tuned for the February issue, where I'll delve deeper into the intricacies of de-icing an aircraft.

 

Instrument Errors

Flying in the Arctic affects our instruments. Cold temperatures impact the altimeter, while the variation influences the magnetic compass.

 

Cold Temperatures

The altimeter, a pressure gauge, is inherently susceptible to temperature deviations. An error occurs when the altimeter indicates the same altitude irrespective of the temperature, while the actual height (true altitude) differs due to changes in air density.

 

"From Warm to Cold, You Won't Get Old!"

 

In warmer temperatures, the altimeter may indicate a lower altitude than actual, and in colder temperatures, it may erroneously indicate a higher altitude. This discrepancy is crucial when flying in clouds and relying solely on instruments.

 

 

Compass Error

Changes in the magnetic field at high latitudes impact the compass. Although the magnetic compass holds less significance in modern airliners, given the prevalence of GPS equipment and gyroscopes in today's navigation, it remains crucial to consider the variation – the angular difference between the compass and true direction. Did you know that the earth's north magnetic pole is located somewhere to the north of Canada and not at the true North Pole? This difference causes the compass to indicate an error called variation. It is the angular difference between the direction measured by the compass (towards the magnetic north pole) and the true direction (geographic north pole). And the further north you get, the more error you experience. Pilots find the information about the variation for any position on their aviation chart. It is named east or west to indicate the side of the true north on which the compass north lies. For instance, at Thule Air Base (BGTL) on Greenland's northwest coast, the variation is almost 42° W.

 

Welcome to Winter Wonderland

As we enter Finnish airspace, the sky clears, unveiling breathtaking views of a frozen world below. The cold beauty is both captivating and challenging, with an otherworldly allure. For me, Finnish Lapland embodies the essence of a winter wonderland. The surreal beauty of snow-covered landscapes and frozen expanses, paired with the serene stillness and the enchanting dance of the Northern Lights, encapsulates the captivating allure of this Arctic region.

Anticipating a challenging approach, we complete our meticulous approach preparations well in advance and maintain full focus, gearing up to execute an ILS approach for a landing on runway 34. Minutes later my First Officer skillfully pilots the aircraft towards the runway, executing a precise and smooth touch down followed by a swift deceleration. The braking action proves excellent, allowing us to promptly vacate through one of the earliest exits. As expected, the tarmac and taxiways exhibit more contamination, a consequence of the ground staff's primary focus on runway clearance. Navigating with caution, I slowly taxi the aircraft to our assigned stand. Shortly after, our guests disembark, and we bid them farewell, extending our best wishes for a delightful time in Winter Wonderland with Kontiki Reisen. With the last passenger disembarked, our attention swiftly shifts to preparing our Airbus A220 for the journey home.

About the image

The January image in the 2024 edition of my photo calendar, titled "Welcome to Winter Wonderland," encapsulates the mesmerizing cold beauty of this otherworldly region. Flying to the Arctic Circle requires profound knowledge of the unique challenges posed by such operations, effective crew coordination, and continuous flight monitoring.

 

Shot on a Canon EOS R5 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art, ISO100, f/6.3, 1/320sec


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.

 

0 Kommentare

Behind the Image: Sailing above Sand (E)

As we journey home from Johannesburg, the breathtaking sight of a sunrise over the Sahara Desert unfolds before us, casting a golden hue over the seemingly endless dunes. The first rays of the new day illuminate this vast expanse, revealing a stark beauty in the midst of a desolate and inhospitable environment. Yet, despite the mesmerizing scenery, our focus remains on the intricate dance of technology and skill needed to traverse this remote region safely.

Perhaps it was the fragrance of a steaming cup of coffee, or perhaps my "inner clock" whispering that a vibrant sunrise awaits just beyond the sun visor. I relish the flight as a passenger, casting my gaze beyond the wing across the boundless expanse of the Sahara, a canvas of memories from my days as a long-haul pilot. En route to distant metropolises, I soared above lands entirely unfamiliar to me, traversing regions almost devoid of human presence. One such realm is the expansive tapestry of the Sahara, cutting across Africa north of the equator in all its width. From the Atlantic Ocean to the shores of the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, this colossal desert unfolds. Contrary to prevailing beliefs, the Sahara is not merely an infinite abyss of sand. A tapestry of diversity spanning millions of square miles across northern Africa. Mountains stand sentinel, ancient volcanoes slumber in their dormant grace, salt flats stretch like glistening mirrors, and vast plains beckon with a quiet majesty. Amidst this enchanting panorama, the illustrious sand dunes dance, an ever-shifting ballet choreographed by the persistent caress of trade winds, sculpting ephemeral masterpieces in the golden sands.

The first rays of the new day illuminate the vast expanse, revealing a stark beauty amid a desolate and inhospitable environment. As my eyes feast on the boundless view, my thoughts wander into the cockpit where flying over such remote areas presents unique challenges for pilots. Unlike densely populated regions with well-established air traffic control systems, remote areas often lack ground-based navigation aids. Pilots must rely on their own skills and experience to safely navigate these regions.

Wayfinding

Embarking on the journey of becoming a pilot, I was first taught how to navigate by visual references. I had to devise a flight plan consisting of landmarks, such as roads, lakes, or settlements, and connecting them to get to the destination I was tasked with. Yet, as I piloted airliners across the globe, veiled by the night and cloaked in clouds that obscured these earthly signposts, the celestial ballet demanded a more nuanced dance of navigation. In the infancy of aviation, hundreds of light beacons were placed on top of mountains to guide the first airmail flight across the American continent, connecting New York with San Francisco. These luminous sentinels, etching trails in the firmament, paved the way for the airborne pioneers. With time, their terrestrial glow yielded to the subtler hum of radio beacons (NDB, VOR), transmitting whispers of their position (bearing and distance) through evolved instruments on the flight deck. However, those ground-based navigation aids are maintenance intensive and above all need solid ground to stand on, making them less of an option in remote areas. Before the invention of GPS, inertial navigation systems (INS) and a long-range radio navigation system (LORAN) were developed to provide independent position information and allow safe and accurate passage of those areas. Today, pilots rely heavily on satellite-based navigation systems. The GPS provides precise positioning and accurate navigation even in the absence of any ground-based navigation aid. In the contemporary skies, the once-luminous beacons have metamorphosed into cryptic five-letter waypoints—coordinates etched in the air, forming a lexicon along the airways that crisscross continents and connect the beating hearts of cities.

Communication in Remote Areas

The sparse skyways above the surreal landscapes are densely treaded at certain times. Just as with navigation, communication, too, finds itself subject to the boundaries of physics. While we usually communicate through shortwave radio (VHF), remote regions require us to rely on a combination of longwave and text communication. The high-frequency (HF) radio and the CPDLC (Controller-Pilot Data Link Communications) are the lifelines that connect us to the outside world. HF radio allows us to communicate with air traffic control in a remote area, even if they are hundreds of miles away. CPDLC, on the other hand, facilitates data link communication between pilots and air traffic controllers, easing our workload while ensuring a streamlined exchange of essential information. As the short-range radios are rendered useless to communicate with air traffic control, we utilize them for pilot-to-pilot communication. This adds another layer of collaboration and safety. In the solitude of the cockpit, pilots share information, insights, and observations, enhancing situational awareness. This peer-to-peer communication fosters a sense of camaraderie among aviators navigating the challenging airspace above the Sahara.

In the Cockpit

While navigating through remote areas pilots are engaged in a myriad of tasks to ensure a smooth and safe flight. Continuous monitoring of the aircraft's systems, weather conditions, and navigation instruments is paramount. The ever-changing nature of the skies requires adaptability, with pilots ready to adjust course and altitude based on real-time information.

Moreover, pilots play a crucial role in managing fuel consumption, optimizing routes for efficiency, and making strategic decisions based on weather patterns. As we sail above the sand, the cockpit becomes a command center where every decision is calculated and every action meticulously executed.

About the image

The title image of 2024 edition of my photo calendar “Sailing above Sand” is a testament to the synergy between human skill and technological marvels. Navigating remote areas demands a harmonious blend of precise navigation, effective communication, and vigilant task management.

 

Shot on a Sony 7S + 24-105mm F4 G SSM @24mm, ISO125, f/5.6, 1/320sec


About "Behind the Image"

In my photo calendar "Up in the Sky" I get to share my favorite aviation pictures with you. This blog series will complement the product and will tell the story about the moment the picture was taken. It will also share comprehensive information about what happend on the flight deck and how the picture was created.